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All rights reserved ® nomenclature 2017

noun \ noh-men-kluh-cher

 

From the Latin nomenclatura (“calling by name, assigning of names”), from nomen (“name”) + calare (“call”)

 

\ the act of naming

 

\ the system, set of terms or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or art

 

 

You may not know their names, but you’ve smelled them.

In fact, you probably smell of them right now.

Without them, your fragrance simply wouldn’t exist.

While natural essences bask in the limelight, synthetics are the clandestine infiltrators that spark off fragrant revolutions. It was the discovery of coumarin that yielded the first modern perfume, Fougère Royale, in 1881. Aldehydes lent their abstract sheen to Chanel N°5. Ethyl-vanillin enhanced Shalimar’s plush cleavage. Hedione® breathed its radiance into Eau Sauvage. And no contemporary scent could do without synthetic musk or the ubiquitous Iso E Super.

 

Whether they imitate nature, tease out its innermost secrets or veer off into botanically impossible smells, synthetics are the true building blocks of perfumery. Elegant solutions discovered by scientists, wafting from labs onto skin and into your nose.

 

Nomenclature celebrates design in perfume chemistry by showcasing today’s most inspiring, exclusive molecules—so exclusive that some, known as “captives,” are zealously guarded by fragrance companies.

 

Through a series of sheer and streamlined compositions, Nomenclature explores their complex facets and their potential for protagonism. Demonstrating that these man-made hybrids of poetry and science have a beauty all their own.
The beauty of modernity.

 

the designers

 

Nomenclature was conceived in New York by Karl Bradl and Carlos Quintero.

 

The former need not be introduced to fragrance lovers. Scent-obsessed since childhood, Karl became an

award-winning perfume designer. While he is not a “nose”, his role is a defining one: he conceptualizes each scent, chooses its notes and ingredients, and guides the perfumer throughout the development process.

 

Carlos Quintero, a self-described “Renaissance” designer, sees his work as a process that can be applied to any facet of life, be it fashion, graphics, furniture, packaging, digital, accessories, objects... He has worked in Italy and New York for prestigious global fragrance, fashion and publishing companies.

 

It was Carlos who originated the boldly modernistic concept of Nomenclature:

 

“Scientists design these outstanding compounds as elegant solutions to very practical problems. For example, to find a compassionate equivalent to musk, an ecological substitute for sandalwood or a cost-efficient alternative to ambergris. I fell in love with the idea of celebrating design in fragrance chemistry.”

 

While Karl is driven by the urge to create beauty for beauty’s sake, Carlos’s passion is to find beautiful, practical solutions. The duo collaborated on each design element of the project, but it was Karl who led the development of the fragrances. “Because fragrances are art, not solutions!” quips Carlos.

 

the packaging

Like the lab-designed molecules that inspired the fragrances, Nomenclature’s packaging offers elegant solutions to a series of practical problems. Namely: protecting the bottle; showcasing the scent; expressing the concept. The result is a statement of design and modernity: spare, beautifully functional, and unique in the world of fragrance.

 

THE BOTTLE AND SPRAYER

The flacon is inspired by the pure, simple lines of the classic Erlenmeyer flask, as a tribute to the chemistry labs where aromatic compounds are designed. As the bottle moves, stunning hologram-like effects rise from the “impossible molecule” patterns embossed at the bottom. To keep the overall design as spare as possible, there is no cap: the brushed stainless steel sprayer is equipped with a coil spring that prevents it from being pressed by accident. The sprayer can be unscrewed, so that the bottle may be repurposed.

 

CLICK TO LEARN MORE

nomenclature

made in new york

Contact us at:

 

info@nomenclature.nyc

 

646.549.2863

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